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ADVERSE IMPACTS OF SEVERE ASCVD: Is PCSK9 Inhibition the Key to Improve Patient Outcomes?

Saturday, 11/18 – 11:10am – 12:30am

Brief Overview

Certain populations are burdened with an excessively high risk for major adverse cardiovascular events, including those with clinically evident atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD), defined as a history of myocardial infarction, non-hemorrhagic stroke, or systemic peripheral artery disease. Other groups at high cardiovascular risk include those with conditions such as familial hypercholesterolemia, diabetes mellitus, or metabolic syndrome.

Since hypercholesterolemia is a major driver of ASCVD, lipid-lowering therapies (mainly in combination with statins) are the primary treatment approach to lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk.  Unfortunately, intensive statin therapy lowers CVD risk only by ~50%, leaving many patients at excessively high residual CVD risk with no good options to reduce this risk.

Learning Objectives

  • Evaluate the extent of residual CVD risk to which high-risk patients are exposed, and alter prescribing behavior to address additional CVD risk elements as appropriate
  • Analyze the potential strengths and weaknesses of new approaches to reduce CVD risk with new LDL-C lowering agents in combination with statins

Supporter

This activity is supported by educational funding donation provided by Amgen.

Accreditation Information

Physicians: This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of Boston University School of Medicine and Rockpointe. Boston University School of Medicine is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Boston University School of Medicine designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

ABIM MOC: Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn up to 1.25 MOC points [and patient safety MOC credit] in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

AAFP: This live activity, ADVERSE IMPACTS OF SEVERE ASCVD: Is PCSK9 Inhibition the Key to Improve Patient Outcomes?, from 9/29/17 – 11/18/17, has been reviewed and is acceptable for up to 1.25 Prescribed credits by the American Academy of Family Physicians. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Faculty Information


Alan S. Brown, MD, FACC, FAHA, FNLA

Director, Division of Cardiology
Advocate Lutheran General Hospital
Co‐Director, Cardiology Service Line
Advocate Medical Group
Clinical Associate Professor
Loyola Stritch School of Medicine
Park Ridge, IL