What You Need to Know about Undiagnosed Atrial Fibrillation, an Under-Recognized Stroke Risk Factor

Saturday, 10/20 – 11:00am – 12:20pm

Overview

While early diagnosis of atrial fibrillation (AFib) can prevent cardiovascular complications, detecting it can be very challenging. Because stroke risk-assessment scores are seldom calculated in real-world settings, clinicians are often unfamiliar with their use or have insufficient time to determine a patient’s score. Nearly 30% of patients with a CHADS2 score of 3 or greater, but no diagnosed AFib, were later found to experience AFib episodes. Routine electrocardiogram (ECG) screening can help diagnose AFib, but such screening won’t detect sporadic and infrequent events that are often silent or asymptomatic. Various ECG self-monitoring apps have been shown to increase the yield of AFib detection.

What You Need to Know about Undiagnosed Atrial Fibrillation, an Under-Recognized Stroke Risk Factor will improve the early detection of AFib through use of stroke risk-assessment scores and appropriate long-term monitoring via ECG apps. Participants will also explore the possibilities for oral anticoagulation in patients with diagnosed AFib or high risk scores.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify patients who have high stroke-associated risk using novel approaches for monitoring and diagnosis
  • Use the CHA2DS2-VASc risk assessment score as a tool to determine the appropriate course of action to manage diagnosed AFib
  • Consider appropriate oral anticoagulation for patients with newly diagnosed AFib and various degrees of disease burden/stroke risk

Target Audience

This activity is intended for primary care physicians and other healthcare professionals who treat patients with stroke-associated risk factors and who also have AFib.

Accreditation Information

The Potomac Center for Medical Education is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

For information about the accreditation of this activity, please email: contact@potomacme.org.

The Potomac Center for Medical Education designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.50 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.

Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation.

ABIM MOC: Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn up to 1.50 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

Please allow 6-8 weeks for your MOC points to appear on your ABIM records.

AAFP: Application for CME credit has been filed with American Academy of Family Physicians. Determination of credit is pending.

Steering Committee

Christopher Cannon, MD
Cardiovascular Division
Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Professor of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
Boston, MA

Christopher Granger, MD, FAHA, FACC
Professor of Medicine
Director, Cardiac Intensive Care Unit
Duke University Medical Center
Durham, NC

Provider

Jointly provided by the Potomac Center for Medical Education and Rockpointe.

      

Supporter

Supported by an educational grant from the Bristol-Myers Squibb and Pfizer Alliance.

Long Beach 2018

Program Faculty

Sean D. Pokorney, MD, MBA
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Associate Director of the Arrhythmia Core Lab
Duke Clinical Research Institute
Duke University
Durham, NC